Etherley Methodist Church

South Road Methodist Church

CHARITY DAY

Many thanks to all who supported the fund raising on 2ND APRIL

The day was a great success and funds raised have been donated to the

MOTOR NEURON DISEASE CHARITY

to help with their vital work.


South Church Methodist Church was opened in 1861 for the benefit of local residents. Members of our congregation these days come from a much wider area to worship at our Church and enjoy the activities and special events that are organised.

As well as Sunday Service the church offers a range of other activities for adults/ children.

A warm welcome is extended to everyone who wishes to come along for worship or other activities/events that take place throughout the year.

Information about Church services will be added to this page when information becomes available

In the meantime further information can be obtained by contacting

Marie Cadman (01388 526692)

Etherley Methodist Church's tribute to all those lost since 1914 and recognition of the many horses and other animals that lost their lives during WW1. Members of the congregation and the wider community gave their time to knit poppies to create the image of the WW1 horse name Warrior.

Warrior was a Real War Horse, foaled on the Isle of Wight in 1908. In 1914 Warrior went to war on the Western Front with Winston Churchill’s great friend, General Jack Seely. There he survived all imaginable disasters and was active in many famous battles including those at the Somme and Ypres. On the battlefields of the First World War, he showed death-defying bravery and inspired thousands of soldiers. He returned home four years later.

Eight million other horses and mules did not survive.

Returning with Jack Seely to his native Isle of Wight in 1918, Warrior lived on until the grand old age of 33, even winning a point to point four years to the day that he had led the charge at Moreuil Wood.

Warrior was posthumously awarded the highest medal for animal gallantry. His obituary in the Evening Standard in 1941 described him as the ‘Horse the Germans Could Not Kill’